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What's Growing Here That We Didn't Plant (redirected from Current Species)

Page history last edited by Ruth 11 months ago

Here is an incomplete list of plants that are growing in the area in and around the food forest. Some details and photos below.

 

Crabgrass

Sorrel                                                                                     

Lambsquarters 

Creeping Charlie

Purslane

Smartweed

Spotted Spurge

Bladder Campion

Evening Lychnis

Bedstraw

Phlox

Dock

Mullein

Goldenrod

Canadian Fleabane or Horseweed

Virginia Creeper

Cypress Spurge

 

Japanese Knotweed

Stinging Nettle

Honeysuckle

Grape

Staghorn Sumac

Buckthorn

 

Boxelder

Green Ash

Butternut

Poplar

Elm

Black Walnut?

Willow

 

 

Closer to the playground

Sycamore

Elderberry

Black Locust

 

 


Late June 2023

It's interesting to know that many common wildflowers are not native species (most of us aren't either) but neither are they all invasive; they just live here now. It's also good to know which are edible and how to positively identify them.

 

​Above right photo - Bladder Campion (Silene cucubalus or S. vulgaris, NOT Bladderwort, not native, NOT invasive), with Cypress Spurge (Euphorbia cyparissias, not native, invasive) and Mullein (Verbascum thapsus, not native). Canadian Fleabane aka Horseweed (Erigeron canadensis, native) in the upper left corner of the photo. Young leaves of Bladder Campion are edible, known as Skulpit or Stridolo in Italy. I have it in my garden and enjoyed it as an early addition to salads. We should make sure they don't mow that!

Photo above on the right is Cypress Spurge. Below are some young Bladder Campion greens.


https://www.tyrantfarms.com/stridolo-silene-vulgaris-how-to-grow-and-eat-with-recipes/ 

 

 There is also some Evening Lychnis here and there (Lychnis alba), similar in some ways to Bladder Campion, but very different and not edible.

 

 

​Spotted spurge (Euphorbia maculata, native) with its maroon spot on each leaf and the ubiquitous and loveable common purslane (Portulaca oleracea). As many of you no doubt know, purslane is edible and great as an addition to salads or all by itself.


 

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